Ken Kishida

Ken Kishida, PhD

Research Scientist

Description of Work

Humans make choices in everything we do. These choices result from biological mechanisms in the brain. My research uses integrative neuroscience approaches to investigate function and dysfunction in the human brain. I utilize invasive and non-invasive techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, to measure physiological activity while individuals are actively engaged in decision-making processes. These and other tools are ripe for developing new insights into the function of the human nervous system.

Measurements of Dopamine Release in Humans
I have recently used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to make the first sub-second measurements of dopamine release in a human brain during an active decision-making task (Kishida et al., 2011). These measurements took place in a patient undergoing deep-brain stimulation electrode implantation for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Currently, I am using this newly developed technology to generate unprecedented insight into the function of dopamine systems in humans.

Biomarkers for Autism Spectrum Disorders
Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and neuroeconomic approaches, I have investigated brain responses associated with social exchange and perspective taking in healthy individuals and volunteers diagnosed with ASD (Chiu et al., 2008, Kishida et al., 2012). Currently I am using a paradigm that utilizes rapid fMRI protocols, experimentally determined regions of interest, and multidimensional classification procedures to identify individuals diagnosed with ASD with good specificity and sensitivity.

Education and Training

  • Baylor College of Medicine: Ph.D., Neuroscience
  • Baylor College of Medicine: Postdoctoral fellowship

Selected Publications

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