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Dongil Chung

Dongil Chung

Cognitive motivations and neural predictors of free-riding and cooperation

When

July 6, 2011, 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Who

Dongil Chung

Ph.D. candidate in Bio and Brain Engineering at the Korea Advanced Institute for Science and Technology

Where

Fralin Biomedical Research Institute, R1059
2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke, VA 24016

Abstract: The current study aims to investigate cognitive motivations and neural predictors of free-riding and cooperation. To achieve this goal, I assessed the underlying mechanism of free-riding with following three approaches:

  1. Behavior study: To elucidate cognitive motivations of free-riding and cooperation and impaired strategic decision making in schizophrenia during a public goods (PG) game
  2. EEG study: To investigate spatiotemporal dynamics of the EEGs that reflect the cognitive motivations of free-riding and cooperation
  3. Computational modeling: To construct a representative agent-based model that simulates cooperation and free-riding behavior and their strategic patterns

The purpose of the first approach was to investigate human strategic decisions based on valuating the incentives to cooperate or to free-ride and particularly the cognitive and emotional motivations of free-riding behavior. We examined the decision patterns of 41 healthy subjects and 37 schizophrenia patients during performance of the PG game. This is the first study to analyze behavioral decision drifts that reflect the information provided during the public goods game in healthy and schizophrenic patient participants, unraveling affective and cognitive motivations to free-ride. The results suggest that loss-sensitivity and theory-of-mind (TOM) as well as cognitive understanding are involved in regulation of the free-riding and cooperative behavior. The purpose of the second approach was to investigate the neural predictors of free-riding and cooperation using EEG recordings. By using non-invasive neural recordings, we could disentangle spatiotemporal interaction of the EEGs that reflect the cognitive motivations of free-riding. Sixty five healthy male participants were recruited for the study and EEGs from 26 participants, 2 randomly selected participants per a group, were recording during the game. This is the first EEG study to investigate neural predictors for free-riding behavior during a public goods game. These findings suggest that cognitive motivations of free-riding and/or cooperation behavior is encoded in parallel with, but distinctive to feedback signal of the preceding results. The purpose of the third approach was to construct a generalized model that simulates free-riding and cooperation behavior. Based on the studies of cognitive and neural motivations of free-riding, we constructed an agent-based model including individual gain/loss attitude, conditional cooperation, and random shifting. This is the first computational modeling study that suggests a representative model that simulates dynamic interaction between cognitive motivations to free-ride and to cooperate.

About the Speaker:

Chung is a Ph.D. candidate in Bio and Brain Engineering at the Korea Advanced Institute for Science and Technology and a postdoctoral candidate to the VTCRI.

View Chung's CV

Additional Details

This is a free event. The host is Pearl Chiu. For more information, please call 540-526-2019, or send an e-mail.

Map and Parking

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