People Related To Breast Cancer Research

Deborah F. Kelly, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Associate Professor, Biological Sciences, College of Science, Virginia Tech
Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine

Zhi Sheng, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute
Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine

Events Related To Breast Cancer

Proteomic Profile of the G1/S Cell Cycle Transition in ER+ Breast Cancer

June 26, 2012, noon at Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute

Milagros Tenga


PhD

Special Seminars

Stories Related To Breast Cancer

VTCRI scientist earns third concurrent grant from the National Cancer Institute to study breast cancer

July 11, 2018

Deb Kelly, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was awarded $2.1 million by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to study the protein that gives rise to ...

Cartledge Charitable Foundation joins fight against breast cancer with gift to Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute

May 1, 2018

The Cartledge Charitable Foundation Inc. has joined the fight against breast cancer with a $100,000 gift to the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute. Positioned in front of an electron microscope ...

VTCRI scientist awarded $2 million National Cancer Institute grant to study breast cancer

March 22, 2018

The National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health has award Deborah Kelly, an associate professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, $2 million to study the mutated ...

Scientists decode breast cancer protein

Sept. 14, 2017

Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have successfully determined the full architecture of the breast cancer susceptibility protein (BRCA1) for the first time. This three-dimensional information provides a ...

Researchers discover how breast cancer mutation in BRCA1 causes protein to self-destruct

Feb. 28, 2017

Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute found that breast cancer cells can trigger the self-destruction of the tumor-suppressing BRCA1 proteins. They published their results in Scientific Reports, a ...

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists are first to visualize breast cancer protein in precise detail

June 16, 2016

A team of scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute developed a novel technique to provide the first three-dimensional view of a protein that can cause breast cancer.

Scientists develop new toolkit to examine molecular mechanisms of human disease

Sept. 29, 2015

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientist Deborah Kelly and her research team developed a tunable microchip to view activity inside a human breast cancer cell for the first time.

Scientist receives research grant to study underpinnings of hard-to-treat, hereditary breast cancer

Aug. 27, 2015

Deborah Kelly, an assistant professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, was recently awarded a $1.8 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, a branch of the National Institutes ...

Researchers to study mechanisms of hard-to-solve, hereditary breast cancer to find treatment options

July 2, 2014

Deborah Kelly and Zhi Sheng, assistant professors at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, were recently named recipients of a grant from the Commonwealth Health Research Board. This board funds ...

Publications Related To Breast Cancer

O'Malley PW, Mulla ZD, Nesic O. (2015). Multiple sclerosis and breast cancer. J Neurol Sci 356(12): 137-41.

Tenga MJ, Lazar IM. (2012). A proteomic snapshot of breast cancer cell cycle: the G1/S transition point. Proteomics.

Horiuchi D, Kusdra L, Huskey NE, Chandriani S, Lenburg ME, Gonzalez-Angulo AM, Creasman KJ, Bazarov AV, Smyth JW, Davis SE, Yaswen P, Mills GB, Esserman LJ, Goga A. (2012). MYC pathway activation in triple-negative breast cancer is synthetic lethal with CDK inhibition. The Journal of Experimental Medicine 209(4): 679-96.